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What a week down at Mtentu with an amazing bunch of Grade six’s. We all learnt some true grit lessons of digging deep especially on our beach walk into a rather howling head wind. The only way to go through a difficult situation is to face it head on.
Education is exceptionally important however education expands beyond the four walls of a classroom. That often is when we learn how to get through things without relying on a comfort zones. Treverton is outstanding especially when it comes to outdoor life lesson experience. Grateful to experience this, especially during the current time we find ourselves in. Nobody should be limited.

#thetrevertonexperience www.treverton.co.za

Mr Joshua Marsden (Sports Coordinator – Prep)

On Friday the 16th of October and group of seven headed off from Treverton to Vergelegen in the Himeville area of the Drakensberg. This group included three pupils (Dimitri Dendrinos, Jarryd van Alphen, and Kai Broom) and four adults. The aim was to summit Ntabana Ntlenjana, the highest point in Southern Africa. We had achieved in 2019, and for Jarryd and Kai, this would be their second summiting of that peak. The difference, however, was that we would use a largely different route, with a descent of a different pass.

Our first night was spent at the base of the Mkhomazi pass. Saturday morning involved a quick ascent of the pass, followed by a gradual ascent of the high berg to Ntabana Ntlenjana. We then descended down the Mohlesi valley that drains the slopes of Ntabana Ntlenjana, and continued to follow that valley before cutting back towards the escarpment up the Mohlesana river with the imposing Ngaqamadolo peak to our right. We camped in this valley. This is a beautiful gently sloped valley. There were many sheep grazing in this area, their presence given away by the gentle tinkling of their bells. There were also a few Basutho shepherds around.

Our descent was via the Ngaqamadolo south pass. We found the pass easily enough, with some confirmation from three Basutho herdsmen who were looking for five lost sheep with their 14-odd pack of typically lean dogs. This pass, of moderate difficulty, took us to the long ridge that eventually leads back to the Vergelegen offices. This was a great trip with stable and warm weather. We enjoyed freshening up in the river at the bottom after the heat of the midday.

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Mr Derek Brown (Head of Life Sciences – College)

The Treverton Equestrian Centre together with generous sponsorships from Mooi River Spar, Westville Spar, the Liebenberg and Allawoodeen families, held a full weekend of riding recently. Saturday focused on a coaching clinic with professional Heidi Caine, followed by show-jumping on Sunday. This is just a short clip of highlights.

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Celebrating over 15 years with Eco Schools as Treverton receives the International Flag Decade Award.

#thetrevertonexperience www.treverton.co.za #youthclimatesave

 

I attended the 5th Annual International Youth Leadership Summit from Thursday to Saturday which was hosted by Earth Eco.

The summit was mainly focused on the conservation of our oceans and to how to save 30% of our oceans by 2030. There were over 400 people who attended from 44 countries. There were many sessions on different topics such as Environmental Advocacy, Science Communication and Leadership and Skill Building which were lead by some amazing speakers, one of them being the National Geographic explorer, Paul Rose.

I  am at a loss for words to try describe how much of an impact this summit was on me, I have never felt so supported and motivated to help save our Earth. I have learnt so much more than just conservation of our ocean, I have learnt how to be a better leader for the Treverton EarthCare group and how to communicate and raise awareness about the Climate crisis more effectively.

This was such an honor for me to attend and I felt quite emotional when it ended to be honest. I would like to thank Mrs Snow and Mrs Beddy for giving me this opportunity and their support.

#thetrevertonexperience www.treverton.co.za #youthclimatesave

Phoolan Rankin (Grade 11)

Six little girls from age 4 to 10 joined us at the Equestrian Centre to learn about ponies.  The aim of these mornings is to create an interest in ponies and to showcase the Equestrian Centre.  With the help of two horsey moms, college riders and a teacher, great fun was had by all.  We focused on safety around ponies, learning parts of the pony (sticky labels were used to label the pony body parts), basic brushing and how to feed treats. We coloured in horsey pictures and ended with a ride around the stable yard.  Scrumptious muffins and juice were provided to fill hungry tummies and a super fun morning sent tired out children home filled with excitement.  Moms and Dads got to chat amongst themselves over a cuppa and start new friendships.  We hope to draw parents in to assist with running the fun days, be it pouring coffee, holding a pony to be labelled or leading a pony around the Yard.  Next month we will add further activities, such as grooming and tack so that the littlies can learn more about loving ponies and what riding is all about.  We welcome preschool and prep children to join in the fun and hope to gear them up towards learning riding skills and being able to take part in the Treverton Pony Theory modules on offer on a Wednesday afternoon.

Miss K’li Scott (Head of Equestrian)

#thetrevertonexperience www.treverton.co.za

 

Treverton, the place where I made the memories that will last a life time.

My 5 years at Treverton were honestly some of the best years of my life so far. Trew House is where my friends became my sisters. I was able to take my horses to school with me and that was plus. I played in the 1st hockey team from grade 9-12 and was part of the athletics team since grade 8, the school gave me the opportunity and the independence to grow as a person and step out of my comfort zone.

I remember the grade 10 hike where all my group did was laugh and cry, at one stage we all thought we were about to get blown off the mountain. And to this day my friends and I still laugh about the hike. I’m just so grateful for the experience that the school gave me, it’s a huge part of who I have become and what I have achieved up until today.

Kylee Mcloughlin (Matric 2013)

#thetrevertonexperience www.treverton.co.za

After 3.5 years here, I am still loving my time at Treverton. After the strong Christian ethos and values, the Equestrian Centre was definitely the deciding factor when choosing a high school. I was so excited to have equestrian right here on the property, and to be able to go down any day to ride and spend time with the horses.

The best thing to do after a long, stressful day at school is to go down to the stables to have a lesson or to go on an outride. To spend time with horses and friends in a beautiful setting is relaxing. It is a fun and supportive environment where everyone feels free to be themselves and have a laugh. We do have our fair share of tough times, but they have taught me that the sport isn’t only about results and shows, and that I am also responsible for my horse, it’s well-being and I need to do the dirty work too.

I consider Treverton to be a family, especially in boarding where we learn to live together with both our similarities and our differences, and where we see each other at our best and at our worst. This applies to the Equestrian Centre too, which is like a little family within the bigger one, where we’ve seen each other crying, covered in dirt after getting bucked off, or while we’ve cheered each other on during a lap of honour after winning at a show. We have learned valuable lessons, to take the good with the bad, because that is what real life is about. To me, the Equestrian Centre is another part of Treverton that really makes it a special and unique place.

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Cassidy Hudson (Grade 11 – College)

We are very proud of Phoolan Rankin who heads, and was instrumental in the re-establishment, of the EarthCare group at the College. She has been elected as the South African lead organiser for the new chapter of Youth Climate Save Movement in South Africa – Janet Snow, Environmental Officer

The movement was founded by Genesis Butler, an environmental activist, who is also followed by Greta Thunberg.  This is such an honor for me, to be able to be in contact with her. Genesis is teaching me so much about leading, being a better leader as well as giving me this opportunity.

The Youth Climate Save Movement is based in Los Angeles and it has spread across 21 countries. Our motto is to give youth a platform for our voices to be heard. We spread awareness about climate change and helping animals as we have a vegan ethos. We take part in summits with people in high places.  Last week, one such summit was held in the US with Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey to ban factory farming in New Jersey.

As the SA representative, I focus on helping South Africa reverse the effects of climate change and raise awareness through an Instagram page called @youthclimatesavesouthafrica. Through our Instagram accounts we try to raise awareness about current events and effects of climate change or any environmental issues that are current.

I’m still very new to this so I’m still learning, I had my first zoom meeting with the team on Sunday, and it was just amazing how much I learnt from these amazing people who are part of our team.

#thetrevertonexperience www.treverton.co.za

Phoolan Rankin (Grade 11)

If you had asked me in grade 8, where I would be in 5 years. I would never have imagined being the person I am today. Having developed in every aspect possible, going Treverton has been one of the best decisions of my life.

#thetrevertonexperience www.treverton.co.za

Matthew Haberl (Deputy Head Boy – College)

I never thought … I would live my dream.

A few years ago I had to break away from city life to just be able to breathe again. I found this cute guest house in the Midlands. I was scared to drive all the way to the coast by myself, so I thought half way will do. A drive 2 or 3 hours out the city will work. In the end it was about a 4-hour drive.

I woke up to the braying of a donkey and I thought: this is where I want to be. Not in a city, noise of cars, pollution, people not caring. I went horse riding that day close to Giants Castle. The mist was so thick; I was scared I would miss the road. But there was also so much beauty. I actually wanted to take photos, but with the mist so thick, another car might drive into me.

When I had to go back, I was sad leaving the tranquility behind. I got back to the rat race of the city. Still enjoying my work, visiting my friends taking up more and more because something was missing.

A few years later I came back. I saw a vacant post at a school in the Midlands, Treverton College. I thought: It is the Midlands, I can stay and work in the Midlands. I stayed at a guesthouse a few kilometres from the school. The first view I had in the mornings, horses. I thought: This is where I want to be. Timing was not right. I went back to the city, the rat race, taking up more and more to do because something was missing. I prayed because I was confused, my heart longed to the country side.

A few years later, my best friend sent me a screenshot of an available post again at Treverton. I asked God what He wanted me to do. Should I apply, should I stay where I was? The answer was: Apply. So I did and yes there I went again, back to the Midlands. They say 3rd time lucky. I just believe God made it possible this time. I packed everything and I left the rat race of the city. I knew God had a plan, I just did not know what yet.

What did I find at Treverton? Amazing people. Learners who are eager to learn. Friends that became family. Friends and learners that accept you the way you are, that will sometimes unknowingly lift your spirits, by just saying something in class that will make you laugh out loud, friends popping in for coffee asking if everything is okay. I can walk to both passions I have. Class and horses. I can take horse riding lessons. I can be with my favourite animals. I never thought that I would make hot dogs to learners who felt devastated by the results of trial exams, I did. Rewarding learners with brownies because the class average was above 70% for an assessment. I never thought I would think about inviting learners to come for coffee. It is so different, Treverton is a family.

I never thought that I would teach with a mask on my face and that masks would become a fashion trend. Yes, I do have my Hufflepuff, Batman and Horse masks. I did know that God sent me here so I can be safe. Like He lifted me from a horse, so that I did not get hurt, He brought me to the safest place I know. Treverton.

I know now: Treverton is the place to be. Treverton is a place of happiness, family.

#thetrevertonexperience www.treverton.co.za

Ms Carin van der Merwe (Afrikaans – College)

This picture, a little damaged and with no glass front, is the only picture in the single room of a man in Bruntville, not far from Treverton College.  He worked at Treverton about a decade back before he lost his job. He received this picture from Chris Ackermann, and the pupils in the picture allow it to be dated to around 2008.

It has been lockdown now, and you may have struggled because, if you are a parent, you may have lost your job or suffered reduced income. Alternatively, if you are a pupil, you may have suffered with the sense of uncertainty that comes with knowing that your parents are struggling and may have to send you to another school. But for our friend from Bruntville, this is not a new struggle, because he has not had work for the last 10 years. You may also have struggled because you have not been able to visit extended family, and your social life has been impacted. But for our friend, this is not a new struggle, because he has no extended family. He only has his brother, who shares a second room in the same building. You may also have struggled because you can’t travel like you normally do, and your house has felt claustrophobic. But for our friend, this is not a new struggle, because, apart from never owning a car, he has not been familiar with more than his one room for many years. You may also struggle with the fear of getting COVID-19, or, more realistically, of your grandparents getting it and maybe succumbing to it. While our friend need not worry much about his relatives getting it – they are almost all gone – he will fear it, but that is also because he lives with HIV. So it’s a matter of perspective, and it’s not to say that our friend does not suffer – he does, the difference is that for him, it’s his constant companion

To our friend from Bruntville, the picture of four pupils in a beautiful setting on the Treverton College campus is a window into a happy phase of his life, and it did not take much to make him happy. Chris Ackermann may have forgotten that he gave this picture to our friend from Bruntville, but he has not forgotten that he got it from Chris. The pupils in the picture may have forgotten that this picture was taken – though they may remember if they read this – but, though he forgets their names, he does not forget the pupils.

This man is an example of those who Jesus refers to as ‘The Lowly’. But the lowly are not only in Bruntville. Those who live on the social fringes where you are, are also the lowly. The child who sits on their own at break. The child who is last to be accepted into the groups for a project, or for a mini-rugby/hockey match. The child who is perceived by others to be unattractive, or who comes from a disadvantaged background and is mocked for that. If you are a parent, then the lowly to you are those on the fringes – neglected – at the work place.

Who are you to the lowly? Do you leave the lowly with good memories, such as the memories our friend from Bruntville has when he looks at the picture on his wall? Or are you part of the environment that leaves then on the fringes? Tender hearts are lacking in this world where individuality is celebrated. But never underestimate the power of kindness rooted in your understanding that Christ was himself described as lowly, and associated with the lowly. See what Isaiah writes: “…he had no form or majesty that we should look at him, and no beauty that we should desire him.He was despised and rejected by men, a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief; and as one from whom men hide their faces he was despised, and we esteemed him not.”

Of course, Christ himself teaches “Whoever receives this child in my name receives me, and whoever receives me receives him who sent me. For he who is least among you all is the one who is great.”

But beyond the boundaries of Treverton is the reality of that community, Bruntville. Lockdown has given you time, and time can allow you to think, to pray, and to plan. Maybe you have a heart for the lowly?

#thetrevertonexperience www.treverton.co.za

Mr Derek Brown (Head of Life Sciences – College)